From: Dave Baker on

"T i m" <news(a)spaced.me.uk> wrote in message
news:qh2c56dv03sfap4hlupqsvp4gabl35bp98(a)4ax.com...
> On Sun, 1 Aug 2010 12:45:52 +0100, "Dave Baker" <Null(a)null.com> wrote:
>
>>"T i m" <news(a)spaced.me.uk> wrote in message
>>news:pn5a565scoho9uliei55dj0paks75r86hq(a)4ax.com...
>>> I've got a little job to do that requires welding some nuts on the
>>> back of some angle (tie-down eyebolts to go inside a trailer) and I'm
>>> not sure if I do some very small tacks and cool each with a damp rag I
>>> might do so and be able to use a Nylock nut?
>>>
>>
>>I doubt it but there are all-metal Philidas locking nuts like the rocker
>>nuts on the Ford CVH engine which would work. I've got dozens of old ones
>>if
>>an 8mm thread would do you.
>
> Thanks very much for the offer Dave but these are 10mm x summat.
>
>> They're flanged ones like these.
>>
>>http://www.philidasfasteners.co.uk/prod_flange.htm
>
> Ah, ok. So they would provide resistance that could be overcome by
> hand on a 40mm diameter eyebolt ring would you think please?

They work just like nylocs. You torque them up normally and the "crimped"
end provides resistance against vibration loosening. I'm getting the feeling
you want the eyebolt to swivel but still not come completely undone. If so
then these aren't the right things for the job.
--
Dave Baker


From: Dave Baker on

"T i m" <news(a)spaced.me.uk> wrote in message
news:mt1c56tfmdo1pqk00i0hge45bnosski3r3(a)4ax.com...
> So, do they actually 'lock' in use or would they allow something like
> said eyebolt to be removed by hand would you think please? I was
> looking for some resistance to stop them undoing if in the trailer and
> unused but to be removable by hand if they were in the way.

What's to stop you tightening the eyebolt with a bar through the eye rather
than just by hand? That would apply sufficient torque to stop them undoing
and a Philidas type nut would be fine for such use.
--
Dave Baker


From: Chris Whelan on
On Mon, 02 Aug 2010 00:56:42 +0100, T i m wrote:

[...]

> So, do they actually 'lock' in use or would they allow something like
> said eyebolt to be removed by hand would you think please? I was looking
> for some resistance to stop them undoing if in the trailer and unused
> but to be removable by hand if they were in the way.

They work pretty much like a Nyloc.

However, both types of stiffnut are designed as "use once" items, so
appear totally unsuited to your application. Methinks you need a new
design!

Chris

--
Remove prejudice to reply.
From: Dave Baker on

"Chris Whelan" <cawhelan(a)prejudicentlworld.com> wrote in message
news:Byv5o.36645$2%2.27183(a)hurricane...
> On Mon, 02 Aug 2010 00:56:42 +0100, T i m wrote:
>
> [...]
>
>> So, do they actually 'lock' in use or would they allow something like
>> said eyebolt to be removed by hand would you think please? I was looking
>> for some resistance to stop them undoing if in the trailer and unused
>> but to be removable by hand if they were in the way.
>
> They work pretty much like a Nyloc.
>
> However, both types of stiffnut are designed as "use once" items, so
> appear totally unsuited to your application. Methinks you need a new
> design!

Agreed. The Philidas nuts retain some vibration loosening control after a
few uses but eventually any type of Nyloc or similar nut just conforms to
the bolt thread and stops working. If the eyebolts are to be removed and
refitted on a regular basis then just use normal nuts and torque the
eyebolts up properly each time with a stout bar through the eye. A decent
pull on a 1 foot extension bar out of a 1/2" drive socket set will apply the
required 30/35 foot lbs easily enough.

Another option is to drill the protuding end of the eyebolts for a cotter
pin or spring pin, fit them loosely and rely on the pin to stop them coming
right out.
--
Dave Baker


From: T i m on
On Mon, 2 Aug 2010 09:42:57 +0100, "Dave Baker" <Null(a)null.com> wrote:

>
>"T i m" <news(a)spaced.me.uk> wrote in message
>news:mt1c56tfmdo1pqk00i0hge45bnosski3r3(a)4ax.com...
>> So, do they actually 'lock' in use or would they allow something like
>> said eyebolt to be removed by hand would you think please? I was
>> looking for some resistance to stop them undoing if in the trailer and
>> unused but to be removable by hand if they were in the way.
>
>What's to stop you tightening the eyebolt with a bar through the eye rather
>than just by hand?

Nothing other than I was trying to make it more of an impromptu thing
than that (not requiring any tools etc).

> That would apply sufficient torque to stop them undoing
>and a Philidas type nut would be fine for such use.

As would then a std nut. ;-(

I've bought this little (5x3) galv steel trailer s/h for our daughter
to have up in Scotland to tow behind the Corsa we've just bought off
her b/f's Dad. I bought one of those because they are light, rather
than the over engineered / heavy solution I would probably build given
the chance. She will be mainly using it to carry her smaller chainsaw
carvings, anything bigger would be moved in his HiLux.

The 'chassis' is pretty light (press galv steel) and therefore you
wouldn't want to put a strap round the trailer for pulling in the
sides too much. And again, because it is quite lightly built I was
going to fix some small bits of angle to the existing main
construction bolts inside the 'C' section chassis and drill through
the trailer floor, angle and mount the nuts under that (so the
eyebolts are attached to the floor and chassis section but without
drilling any extra holes in the chassis).

However, there may be times when these eyebolts would be in the way
and they might just like to unscrew them to provide a flat floor but
that might be somewhere where they don't have time to muck about with
tools etc.

Soo, if there was a way they could be screwed in by hand but that
there was a reasonable chance they wouldn't just work their way out if
not actually doing anything (if there was a strap or rope through them
they wouldn't come out) then that would be the ideal solution. Maybe
just plain nut welded underneath and a drop of Loctite or paint on the
bolt thread now and again (and allowed to dry before re-inserting) to
make them a bit more resistant would be sufficient.

However, there's a good chance they would stay in all the time and
only be removed as and when so a suitable tommy bar / old screwdriver
left in the boot might do it.

And I've got a draw of plain M10 nuts in the workshop. ;-)

Cheers, T i m