From: hls on

"chuckcar" <chuck(a)nil.car> wrote in message
> What exactly is the problem with using ordinary run of the mill organic
> soap here? The whole point is to have something which bonds with the
> oil and stays on the surface of the water to be scooped up. A bit
> late for that as it's already washing ashore, but that's the point
> isn't it?
>
> --
> (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )

There are plenty of surfactants which can disperse an oil spill without
being toxic. Ordinary soap is not very effective in this regard, but IS
essentially of low toxicity and biodegradable.

The dispersants are NOT used to bring the oil to the surface..They are
used somewhat negatively to reduce the oil sheen from platforms which
are discharging levels of oil into the sea AND they are used to try to
disperse oil into the seawater so that bacteria can act on the
microparticles
and metabolize them.

To be approved for use, these surfactant formulations have to be
tested by various testing organizations. One of the primary ones was
Warren Springs. If done properly, the dispersant AND a goodly
portion of the petroleum hydrocarbon will be destroyed by bacterial
degradation.

If you just want to "hide" the apparent oil slick, some effective compounds
have been used, but they often do not result in cleaning the hydrocarbon
from the ocean.

Dont believe everything (anything) you hear news commentators say.
These people are ignorant beyond belief, and seem bent upon stirring
public sentiment.

What we need now are sound heads, good technology, and a lot of
luck..


From: cuhulin on
Do you live in Florida? If so, did it rain oil there today? Eve said it
rained oil onto her car.We got some rain here today, but it didn't rain
oil.

http://www.rense.com/general91/rse.htm
cuhulin

From: chuckcar on
"hls" <hls(a)nospam.nix> wrote in
news:ZtGdneK7bdBC1p3RnZ2dnUVZ_rqdnZ2d(a)giganews.com:

>
> "chuckcar" <chuck(a)nil.car> wrote in message
>> What exactly is the problem with using ordinary run of the mill
>> organic soap here? The whole point is to have something which bonds
>> with the oil and stays on the surface of the water to be scooped up.
>> A bit late for that as it's already washing ashore, but that's the
>> point isn't it?
>
> There are plenty of surfactants which can disperse an oil spill
> without being toxic. Ordinary soap is not very effective in this
> regard, but IS essentially of low toxicity and biodegradable.
>
> The dispersants are NOT used to bring the oil to the surface..They are
> used somewhat negatively to reduce the oil sheen from platforms which
> are discharging levels of oil into the sea AND they are used to try to
> disperse oil into the seawater so that bacteria can act on the
> microparticles
> and metabolize them.
>
That's not at all relevant the the proesent context.

> To be approved for use, these surfactant formulations have to be
> tested by various testing organizations. One of the primary ones was
> Warren Springs. If done properly, the dispersant AND a goodly
> portion of the petroleum hydrocarbon will be destroyed by bacterial
> degradation.
>
> If you just want to "hide" the apparent oil slick, some effective
> compounds have been used, but they often do not result in cleaning the
> hydrocarbon from the ocean.
>
> Dont believe everything (anything) you hear news commentators say.
> These people are ignorant beyond belief, and seem bent upon stirring
> public sentiment.
>
> What we need now are sound heads, good technology, and a lot of
> luck..
>
And removal of all the corruption that led to this mess in the first
place.

I just would like *someone* tell me how exactly this soap, as that *is*
what we're talking about here, is supposed to help clean up the oil
spill. I proposed a viable reason, but I see nothing in your reply with
either confirms or negates that it would work.

--
(setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
From: hls on

"chuckcar" <chuck(a)nil.car> wrote in message
news:Xns9D86CF1748982chuck(a)127.0.0.1...
> "hls" <hls(a)nospam.nix> wrote in
> news:ZtGdneK7bdBC1p3RnZ2dnUVZ_rqdnZ2d(a)giganews.com:
>
>>
>> "chuckcar" <chuck(a)nil.car> wrote in message
>>> What exactly is the problem with using ordinary run of the mill
>>> organic soap here? The whole point is to have something which bonds
>>> with the oil and stays on the surface of the water to be scooped up.
>>> A bit late for that as it's already washing ashore, but that's the
>>> point isn't it?
>>
>> There are plenty of surfactants which can disperse an oil spill
>> without being toxic. Ordinary soap is not very effective in this
>> regard, but IS essentially of low toxicity and biodegradable.
>>
>> The dispersants are NOT used to bring the oil to the surface..They are
>> used somewhat negatively to reduce the oil sheen from platforms which
>> are discharging levels of oil into the sea AND they are used to try to
>> disperse oil into the seawater so that bacteria can act on the
>> microparticles
>> and metabolize them.
>>
> That's not at all relevant the the proesent context.
>
>> To be approved for use, these surfactant formulations have to be
>> tested by various testing organizations. One of the primary ones was
>> Warren Springs. If done properly, the dispersant AND a goodly
>> portion of the petroleum hydrocarbon will be destroyed by bacterial
>> degradation.
>>
>> If you just want to "hide" the apparent oil slick, some effective
>> compounds have been used, but they often do not result in cleaning the
>> hydrocarbon from the ocean.
>>
>> Dont believe everything (anything) you hear news commentators say.
>> These people are ignorant beyond belief, and seem bent upon stirring
>> public sentiment.
>>
>> What we need now are sound heads, good technology, and a lot of
>> luck..
>>
> And removal of all the corruption that led to this mess in the first
> place.
>
> I just would like *someone* tell me how exactly this soap, as that *is*
> what we're talking about here, is supposed to help clean up the oil
> spill. I proposed a viable reason, but I see nothing in your reply with
> either confirms or negates that it would work.
>

Then you are a little slow.
I have told you the science behind it, and you cant seem to understand.
Oil spill dispersants are intended to break the oil into microparticles so
that naturally occuring bacteria can attack and metabolize the oil more
efficiently.

These bacterial can metabolize oil, and convert it to, among other things,
aminoacids which are further biodegradable.

A lot depends upon the temperature of the system, the dispersion of the
oil, the bacterial present, the time available, etc.

If you cant understand that, you need to have some remedial education.

From: Tegger on
"hls" <hls(a)nospam.nix> wrote in
news:RtudnQYES6_39J3RnZ2dnUVZ_h6dnZ2d(a)giganews.com:


>
> These bacterial can metabolize oil, and convert it to, among other
> things, aminoacids which are further biodegradable.


Bacterial decomposition was the primary mechanism by which the Valdez spill
was eliminated. The human element was mostly for the TVs.



--
Tegger