From: Doug on
From the latest 'Street Lifre' Spring 2010 by Living Streets.

"There are 28 million cars on our streets, and 90% of the
time they will be parked.
As car ownership has increased, so to has the pressure for
car parking spaces, resulting in an increasing number of
vehicles being parked illegally on our pavements. Although
it might not seem like a major problem to many, for
parents with buggies, people using wheelchairs or older
people who need support to walk, pavements blocked by
parked cars can mean there is no way through without
being forced to risk walking in the road. And it is not just
access which causes problems - our pavements aren’t built
to withstand the weight of vehicles – by driving onto them
footpaths get damaged, creating trip hazards that cause
even more problems.

We want:
• the UK Government to make pavement parking illegal
throughout the UK;
• the Scottish Government to expand dropped kerb
regulations into Scotland;
• all local authorities to take on the enforcement of
parking offences;
• the UK Government to lead a wider national “pavement
education” campaign on all aspects of using our
pavements – including anti-social parking and cycling;
• where police are responsible for enforcement, to take
the issue more seriously and enforce all instances of
pavement parking."

“Where I live motorists not
only park, but also drive
for some distance along a
pavement by the shops. It’s
only four feet wide at most,
and pedestrians are forced
into the road. Sometimes
it is frightening, and makes
walking locally a trial rather
than a pleasure.”

http://www.livingstreets.org.uk/

--
UK Radical Campaigns
www.zing.icom43.net
All public road users are equal but some are more equal than others.
From: delboy on
On 5 Mar, 13:24, Doug <jag...(a)riseup.net> wrote:
> From the latest 'Street Lifre' Spring 2010 by Living Streets.
>
> "There are 28 million cars on our streets, and 90% of the
> time they will be parked.
> As car ownership has increased, so to has the pressure for
> car parking spaces, resulting in an increasing number of
> vehicles being parked illegally on our pavements. Although
> it might not seem like a major problem to many, for
> parents with buggies, people using wheelchairs or older
> people who need support to walk, pavements blocked by
> parked cars can mean there is no way through without
> being forced to risk walking in the road. And it is not just
> access which causes problems - our pavements aren’t built
> to withstand the weight of vehicles – by driving onto them
> footpaths get damaged, creating trip hazards that cause
> even more problems.
>
> We want:
> • the UK Government to make pavement parking illegal
> throughout the UK;
> • the Scottish Government to expand dropped kerb
> regulations into Scotland;
> • all local authorities to take on the enforcement of
> parking offences;
> • the UK Government to lead a wider national “pavement
> education” campaign on all aspects of using our
> pavements – including anti-social parking and cycling;
> • where police are responsible for enforcement, to take
> the issue more seriously and enforce all instances of
> pavement parking."
>
> “Where I live motorists not
> only park, but also drive
> for some distance along a
> pavement by the shops. It’s
> only four feet wide at most,
> and pedestrians are forced
> into the road. Sometimes
> it is frightening, and makes
> walking locally a trial rather
> than a pleasure.”
>
> http://www.livingstreets.org.uk/
>
> --
> UK Radical Campaignswww.zing.icom43.net
> All public road users are equal but some are more equal than others.

I can feel that strange pain in my backside coming on again!

Parking your car alongside the kerb just reduces the amount of
remaining width on the road for all users, including cyclists.
Obviously if you park partly on the pavement you should leave enough
room for mothers pushing baby buggies etc.

Derek C
From: Doug on
On 5 Mar, 13:33, delboy <del.copel...(a)tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
> On 5 Mar, 13:24, Doug <jag...(a)riseup.net> wrote:
>
>
>
> > From the latest 'Street Lifre' Spring 2010 by Living Streets.
>
> > "There are 28 million cars on our streets, and 90% of the
> > time they will be parked.
> > As car ownership has increased, so to has the pressure for
> > car parking spaces, resulting in an increasing number of
> > vehicles being parked illegally on our pavements. Although
> > it might not seem like a major problem to many, for
> > parents with buggies, people using wheelchairs or older
> > people who need support to walk, pavements blocked by
> > parked cars can mean there is no way through without
> > being forced to risk walking in the road. And it is not just
> > access which causes problems - our pavements aren’t built
> > to withstand the weight of vehicles – by driving onto them
> > footpaths get damaged, creating trip hazards that cause
> > even more problems.
>
> > We want:
> > • the UK Government to make pavement parking illegal
> > throughout the UK;
> > • the Scottish Government to expand dropped kerb
> > regulations into Scotland;
> > • all local authorities to take on the enforcement of
> > parking offences;
> > • the UK Government to lead a wider national “pavement
> > education” campaign on all aspects of using our
> > pavements – including anti-social parking and cycling;
> > • where police are responsible for enforcement, to take
> > the issue more seriously and enforce all instances of
> > pavement parking."
>
> > “Where I live motorists not
> > only park, but also drive
> > for some distance along a
> > pavement by the shops. It’s
> > only four feet wide at most,
> > and pedestrians are forced
> > into the road. Sometimes
> > it is frightening, and makes
> > walking locally a trial rather
> > than a pleasure.”
>
> >http://www.livingstreets.org.uk/
>
> > --
> > UK Radical Campaignswww.zing.icom43.net
> > All public road users are equal but some are more equal than others.
>
> I can feel that strange pain in my backside coming on again!
>
> Parking your car alongside the kerb just reduces the amount of
> remaining width on the road for all users, including cyclists.
> Obviously if you park partly on the pavement you should leave enough
> room for mothers pushing baby buggies etc.
>
Better still, only buy a car if you have somewhere to put it when it
is not in use, instead of cluttering public spaces. Why this was ever
allowed by government in the first place at the onset of the mass car
culture is a complete mystery.

--
Carfree UK
http://carfree.org.uk/
Promoting carfree development and its environmental, social, financial
and health benefits.
From: Brimstone on


"Doug" <jagmad(a)riseup.net> wrote in message
news:87cb0a6a-d91b-4ccf-8409-76599508dcd9(a)u9g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
> Why this was ever allowed by government in the first place at the onset
> of the mass car
> culture is a complete mystery.
>
When was the onset of the mass car culture Doug?


From: ChelseaTractorMan on
On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 05:24:18 -0800 (PST), Doug <jagmad(a)riseup.net>
wrote:

>�Where I live motorists not
>only park, but also drive
>for some distance along a
>pavement by the shops. It�s
>only four feet wide at most,
>and pedestrians are forced
>into the road. Sometimes
>it is frightening, and makes
>walking locally a trial rather
>than a pleasure.�

thats a case of bad pavement parking, in some areas theres nowhere
else to park and the residents want to park half on the pavement,
(they are also the pedestrians) and the council sensibly paints
parking boxes, give and take is whats needed, not fanatical anti or
pro car national broadbrush attitudes.
--
Mike. .. .
Gone beyond the ultimate driving machine.
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