From: Dave Plowman (News) on
In article <Vgzw9cAN1g+KFwDg(a)nospam.demon.co.uk>,
Roger Hunt <nospam(a)nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> > Mate had a puncture - a screw in the tyre of his new Audi A3. It's
> >done less than 1000 miles. Asked for some help since he's got a problem
> >in one hand.
> >
> > Went round and took off the wheel - it's got a space saver spare so
> >decided to get it fixed there and then so just left it jacked up.

> You left it jacked up? And unattended?
> Did you not lower it onto blocks of something?
> If not, you are asking for a disaster.

Try discussing things you know about.

--
*Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool*

Dave Plowman dave(a)davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
From: Roger Hunt on
Dave Plowman (News) <dave(a)davenoise.co.uk> wrote
>In article <Vgzw9cAN1g+KFwDg(a)nospam.demon.co.uk>,
> Roger Hunt <nospam(a)nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>> > Mate had a puncture - a screw in the tyre of his new Audi A3. It's
>> >done less than 1000 miles. Asked for some help since he's got a problem
>> >in one hand.
>> >
>> > Went round and took off the wheel - it's got a space saver spare so
>> >decided to get it fixed there and then so just left it jacked up.
>
>> You left it jacked up? And unattended?
>> Did you not lower it onto blocks of something?
>> If not, you are asking for a disaster.
>
>Try discussing things you know about.
>
This is no discussion - I stand by what I said and you know I am right.
--
Roger Hunt
From: steve robinson on
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

> In article <MPG.2563c7525d3f475a989953(a)news.eternal-september.org>,
> Conor <conor(a)gmx.co.uk> wrote:
> > > By what process would a wheel bolt, tightened to the correct
> > > torque, become significantly less tight?
> > >
> > When the wheel heats up during the journey. Or do you drive a
> > magical car where the brakes don't get hot?
>
> How about all the other fixings in a car that get hot too? Should
> they all be checked? If not what makes the wheel ones special?
From: Tim on
Chris Whelan wrote:
> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 16:46:52 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
>
>> Mate had a puncture - a screw in the tyre of his new Audi A3. It's
>> done less than 1000 miles. Asked for some help since he's got a
>> problem in one hand.
>>
>> Went round and took off the wheel - it's got a space saver spare so
>> decided to get it fixed there and then so just left it jacked up. The
>> screw was in the outer main groove of the tread - quite a way in from
>> the edge so thought it would be repairable.
>>
>> Took it to Kwik-Fit - they are the nearest tyre place. Bloke got
>> out a special ruler and then a some sort of round template and
>> pronounced the tyre scrap. Quoted 160 quid for a new one...
>>
>> Went to a specialist place I'd used for tracking - they have a four
>> wheel
>> computer alignment setup - and they fixed it for 7.50.
>>
>> What is the formula for how close to the edge of the tread it can be?
>> And is it somewhat of a guess?
>
> No, it's covered by BS AU 159f.
>
> This may help:
>
> http://www.etyres.co.uk/etyres-press-media/repairable-area-gauge.htm

The table shown seems to contradict the written text.

"The repairable area is defined as a percentage of the tyre's "nominal"
section width and thus varies by the size of the tyre. "

If you calculate the percentages from the given table (I was bored) you find
that they vary from 60% on narrower section tyres to 70% on the wider ones.
Clearly then it's not "a" percentage, it's a range of percentages.

Of course it may be that the word "nominal" is what makes the difference but
I'm not sure how this is defined (other than by the obvious sidewall
markings).

Tim

From: Usenet Nutter on
On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 18:47:38 -0000, "Roger"
<roger20nospam(a)ntlworld.com> wrote:

>
>"Chris Whelan" <cawhelan(a)prejudicentlworld.com> wrote in message
>news:ZsiKm.17$uh1.10(a)newsfe20.ams2...
>> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 18:06:00 +0000, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
>>
>>> Dave Plowman (News) used his keyboard to write :
>>>> BTW, congrats to Audi for giving the wheel bolt torque in the driver's
>>>> handbook. 120 Nm If only they took their own advice - it was nowhere
>>>> that tight when I took it off.
>>>
>>> They can settle in a little, especially so on a new car. The advice is
>>> to recheck them after a period.
>>
>> By what process would a wheel bolt, tightened to the correct torque,
>> become significantly less tight?
>>
>> Chris
>>
>> --
>
>Every garage and manufacturer and main dealership must be wrong. If you
>don't know the answer then you might as well give up !
>Still, it's given us all a laugh.
>On this odd occasion, Kwik Fit was correct. Did you get a receipt from the
>garage that did the puncture repair as you might need it for a legal claim
>against them in the future.
>

Why is it I just know it's you ( Roger) that has posted what I am
reading without looking at the poster's name