From: Dave Plowman on
In article <GqCdna6pQ8oaVznWnZ2dnUVZ7tednZ2d(a)pipex.net>,
JNugent <JN(a)noparticularplacetogo.com> wrote:
> Drink is cheap in French and Italian supermarkets (cheaper than here),
> but public (and private) drunkenness is almost unknown in those
> countries.

Another myth.

--
*Monday is an awful way to spend 1/7th of your life *

Dave Plowman dave(a)davesound.co.uk London SW 12

From: JNugent on
Dave Plowman wrote:

> JNugent <JN(a)noparticularplacetogo.com> wrote:

>> Drink is cheap in French and Italian supermarkets (cheaper than here),
>> but public (and private) drunkenness is almost unknown in those
>> countries.

> Another myth.

Is it?

Perhaps I should have added: "except among British tourists".
From: Steve Firth on
Dave Plowman <dave(a)davesound.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <GqCdna6pQ8oaVznWnZ2dnUVZ7tednZ2d(a)pipex.net>,
> JNugent <JN(a)noparticularplacetogo.com> wrote:
> > Drink is cheap in French and Italian supermarkets (cheaper than here),
> > but public (and private) drunkenness is almost unknown in those
> > countries.
>
> Another myth.

Umm well not really. Drink is certainly much cheaper in Italy than in
the UK. I generally pay about �5-10 for malt whisky in Italy. Most
alcoholic drink is so cheap that the cost doesn't really factor into a
decision on whether or not to buy it. If one wanted to be a serious
alcoholic 95% alcohol (suitable for copnsumption) is sold in
supermarkets in five litre containers. It's used at home by people who
either want a cleaning solvent or a base for home-made alcoholic drinks,
the most common being "limoncello".

Despite this, public drunkeness is noticeable by its complete and utter
absence. Even in the seaside towns where the tourists flock in by
Ryanair there is no experience of drunks in the street as can be seen
even in quiet market towns in the UK.

AFAIK we have one public drunk in our town. I know him fairly well and
he's a schizophrenic with a shed load of other problems, yes he drinks
to excess, in public, and one thing that is noticeable is that the
locals all make sure that he eats, socialises and much as possible and
that he doesn't become a public nuisance.

I can't recall seeing any other public drunks in the last fifteen years.

As for drunks at home, well yes there's one person I suspect is an
alcoholic and possibly a wife-beater when he's drunk. But the incidence
is extremely low, so low that I'd agree that "almost unknown" is a
decent description.
From: JNugent on
Dave Plowman wrote:

> Adrian <toomany2cvs(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>> Dave Plowman <dave(a)davesound.co.uk>:

>>>> You seem to forget that it's already an offence to be intoxicated in
>>>> public

>>> Given such places make their money by selling alcohol they're unlikely
>>> to police that law very well themselves.

>> Then they are at risk of losing their licence, since it's also a breach
>> of their licensing conditions to serve drunk people.

>>> I'm talking about enjoyment of a meal out.

>> Sounds like you want your enjoyment at the expense of everybody else's.

> No - just like to hear the conversation round my table without it being
> drowned out by a load of hooray henries - as happened on Thursday.

<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lKwXwU5iWs>
From: Adrian on
"Brimstone" <brimstone(a)hotmail.com> gurgled happily, sounding much like
they were saying:

>> The only reason I put the two words together is that my local sells
>> Stalla Artois.

> Which I would not describe as lager.

Wouldn't you? Why not? It _is_ a lager.

"Decent"? Now that's a different question...