From: Brad on
Noddy wrote:
> "Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4c28640a(a)news.x-privat.org...
>
>> The ticking subsides when it warms up, so probably not that. But
>> sounds like a good tip for the future.
>>
>> The mechanic has it now, so will probably find out the verdict
>> tomorrow.
>
> Most mitsu engines of that vintage have hydraulic lash adjusters in
> the rocker arms, and they're particularly prone to being clocked with
> sludge or the oil passages being blocked which prevents them from
> pumping up and being quiet. They'll usually quiet down once the
> engine warms up, but it's not uncommon for a few of them to refuse to
> play at all and remain "ticky". There's a specific procedure for
> bleeding them if they're noisy, but that involves pulling them out
> which isn't a 5 minute job. Last time I looked for some only genuine
> ones were available and they were about 45 bucks each which is pretty
> hot for something an inch long by half an inch in diameter, but there
> may be non genuine replacements around these days.
> If you do discover the noise is caused by the lash adjusters and have
> them replaced (which will be costly), then giving the engine a diet
> of a decent oil, changed regularly, will definitely help keep them in
> good order. I used to feed Mitsu engines with hydraulic lash
> adjusters Penrite HPR-15 which is a 15w-60 semi synthetic and it
> worked *really* well at keeping them in good order even after some
> horrendously hard working high mileage applications.
> Another option you could try if you were so inclined, but it would
> involve a bit of work, would be to swap the hydraulically actuated
> rocker gear for the manually adjusted variety from an earlier engine.
>
> You'd need to do a bit of detective work to see what fits what, but I
> know on some of the 4G63 engines as fitted to the L-300 vans I had to
> change a couple of them from hydraulic to manual for a couple of
> clients who got sick of changing lifters. The 4g63 of the L-300 was
> just a basic 8 valve engine, and I *think* from memory the rocker
> arms from some of the early Magna 4 cylinders could be used on the
> later model hydraulic shafts. It certainly worked well for those
> customers who wanted it done, but with the down side being that they
> needed regular valve lash adjustments. Still, in their opinion that
> was cheaper and more reliable than replacing lash adjusters every so
> often.

Thanks for the advice.

The mechanic ended up saying the car was ok. He reckoned the noisy top end
was just low oil level and lack of a recent oil change. He welded up a
broken muffler, changed the oil, filters and plugs, said he checked the
gearbox fluid and topped it up... and charged a bit over 500 bucks. (does
that sound like a lot?)

There is a noise coming from behind the timing belt cover still, which
sounds pretty awful, but the mechanic says it is probably just caused by
part of the plastic cover hardening with age and vibrating and or hitting
something inside when it revs, and doesn't sound like a serious issue to
him. And would cost more than it's worth to solve right now.

Do you know these 2.0l Mitsubishi motors? How hard/expensive could it really
be to replace the timing belt cover??

--
Brad


From: Brad on
hippo wrote:
> Noddy wrote:
>>
>>
>> "Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4c28640a(a)news.x-privat.org...
>>
>>> The ticking subsides when it warms up, so probably not that. But
>>> sounds like a good tip for the future.
>>>
>>> The mechanic has it now, so will probably find out the verdict
>>> tomorrow.
>>
>> Most mitsu engines of that vintage have hydraulic lash adjusters in
>> the rocker arms, and they're particularly prone to being clocked
>> with sludge or the oil passages being blocked which prevents them
>> from pumping up and being quiet. They'll usually quiet down once the
>> engine warms up, but it's not uncommon for a few of them to refuse
>> to play at all and remain "ticky". There's a specific procedure for
>> bleeding them if they're noisy, but that involves pulling them out
>> which isn't a 5 minute job. Last time I looked for some only genuine
>> ones were available and they were about 45 bucks each which is
>> pretty hot for something an inch long by half an inch in diameter,
>> but there may be non genuine replacements around these days.
>>
>> If you do discover the noise is caused by the lash adjusters and
>> have them replaced (which will be costly), then giving the engine a
>> diet of a decent oil, changed regularly, will definitely help keep
>> them in good order. I used to feed Mitsu engines with hydraulic lash
>> adjusters Penrite HPR-15 which is a 15w-60 semi synthetic and it
>> worked *really* well at keeping them in good order even after some
>> horrendously hard working high mileage applications.
>>
>> Another option you could try if you were so inclined, but it would
>> involve a bit of work, would be to swap the hydraulically actuated
>> rocker gear for the manually adjusted variety from an earlier engine.
>>
>> You'd need to do a bit of detective work to see what fits what, but
>> I know on some of the 4G63 engines as fitted to the L-300 vans I had
>> to change a couple of them from hydraulic to manual for a couple of
>> clients who got sick of changing lifters. The 4g63 of the L-300 was
>> just a basic 8 valve engine, and I *think* from memory the rocker
>> arms from some of the early Magna 4 cylinders could be used on the
>> later model hydraulic shafts. It certainly worked well for those
>> customers who wanted it done, but with the down side being that they
>> needed regular valve lash adjustments. Still, in their opinion that
>> was cheaper and more reliable than replacing lash adjusters every so
>> often.
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>> Noddy.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> Did something I *never* usually do on the 12V Excel X3 that went all
> clattery: flushed it twice 5000Kms apart. Still running like a (rather
> elderly Korean) sewing machine 20+ 000 later. Worth trying on this
> one?

An oil change seems to have quietened the noisy top end.

--
Brad


From: Noddy on

"Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
news:4c347774(a)news.x-privat.org...

> Do you know these 2.0l Mitsubishi motors?

Reasonably.

> How hard/expensive could it really be to replace the timing belt cover??

It depends on the vehicle.

Mitsubishi spread their engines across a host of different vehicles, and the
same base engine can be found in anything from an Express van to an Evo. How
hard it is to do anything on them depends largely on what it is your trying
to do and what vehicle the engine is in. With the timing cover, it's fairly
easy to change one in a van as they run a north-south engine configuration
with nothing in front to worry about other than the fan, but in some other
vehicles with an east-west arrangement there's usually an engine support in
the way that makes the job a lot more difficult.

If the RVR is fwd, and I suspect it is, then changing the timing belt cover
wouldn't be a five minute job. I'd also suspect that the rattle in the top
of then engine *isn't* a timing cover problem as I've never seen one yet
that has caused such an issue. I have, on the other hand, seen plenty of
snapped balance shaft belts that cause similar problems.

If you're concerned, I'd be pulling the front off the engine to take a look.

--
Regards,
Noddy.



From: Scotty on

"Noddy" <me(a)home.com> wrote in message news:4c3516c6$0$45612$c30e37c6(a)exi-reader.telstra.net...
:
: "Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
: news:4c347774(a)news.x-privat.org...
:
: > Do you know these 2.0l Mitsubishi motors?
:
: Reasonably.
:
: > How hard/expensive could it really be to replace the timing belt cover??
:
: It depends on the vehicle.
:
: Mitsubishi spread their engines across a host of different vehicles, and the
: same base engine can be found in anything from an Express van to an Evo. How
: hard it is to do anything on them depends largely on what it is your trying
: to do and what vehicle the engine is in. With the timing cover, it's fairly
: easy to change one in a van as they run a north-south engine configuration
: with nothing in front to worry about other than the fan, but in some other
: vehicles with an east-west arrangement there's usually an engine support in
: the way that makes the job a lot more difficult.
:
: If the RVR is fwd, and I suspect it is, then changing the timing belt cover
: wouldn't be a five minute job. I'd also suspect that the rattle in the top
: of then engine *isn't* a timing cover problem as I've never seen one yet
: that has caused such an issue. I have, on the other hand, seen plenty of
: snapped balance shaft belts that cause similar problems.
:
: If you're concerned, I'd be pulling the front off the engine to take a look.
:
: --
: Regards,
: Noddy.
:

Or the noise is a well worn belt with some fabrib smacking the plastic covers.


From: OzOne on
On Thu, 8 Jul 2010 17:17:04 +1000, " Scotty" <scoter1(a)warmmail.com>
wrote:

>
>"Noddy" <me(a)home.com> wrote in message news:4c3516c6$0$45612$c30e37c6(a)exi-reader.telstra.net...
>:
>: "Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
>: news:4c347774(a)news.x-privat.org...
>:
>: > Do you know these 2.0l Mitsubishi motors?
>:
>: Reasonably.
>:
>: > How hard/expensive could it really be to replace the timing belt cover??
>:
>: It depends on the vehicle.
>:
>: Mitsubishi spread their engines across a host of different vehicles, and the
>: same base engine can be found in anything from an Express van to an Evo. How
>: hard it is to do anything on them depends largely on what it is your trying
>: to do and what vehicle the engine is in. With the timing cover, it's fairly
>: easy to change one in a van as they run a north-south engine configuration
>: with nothing in front to worry about other than the fan, but in some other
>: vehicles with an east-west arrangement there's usually an engine support in
>: the way that makes the job a lot more difficult.
>:
>: If the RVR is fwd, and I suspect it is, then changing the timing belt cover
>: wouldn't be a five minute job. I'd also suspect that the rattle in the top
>: of then engine *isn't* a timing cover problem as I've never seen one yet
>: that has caused such an issue. I have, on the other hand, seen plenty of
>: snapped balance shaft belts that cause similar problems.
>:
>: If you're concerned, I'd be pulling the front off the engine to take a look.
>:
>: --
>: Regards,
>: Noddy.
>:
>
>Or the noise is a well worn belt with some fabrib smacking the plastic covers.
>

Quite possible!




OzOne of the three twins

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