From: Noddy on

" Scotty" <scoter1(a)warmmail.com> wrote in message
news:4c357b72$0$17174$afc38c87(a)news.optusnet.com.au...

> Or the noise is a well worn belt with some fabrib smacking the plastic
> covers.

That's pretty unlikely.

There'd need to be some pretty substantial separation going on for the
timing belt to be making a noise, and even then you'd only hear it for a
very short time before the belt broke. If the noise is indeed due to a belt
rubbing, then it's more likely to be the timing case rubbing on the belt (or
a pulley) because it's lost a retaining bolt or two.

There's two timing belts under the cover of a 4G63 engine (if that is indeed
what this PVR actually uses): The timing belt, which drives the camshaft and
oil pump, and the balance shaft belt which is also known as "timing belt B".
They're *very* prone to breaking, and when they do they usually slap up
against the timing cover as the main timing belt "whips" them when it spins.

I'm not saying that this is the problem in this particular case, but it's a
common source of noise on older Mitsu engines.

--
Regards,
Noddy.



From: Brad on
Noddy wrote:
> "Brad" <optional(a)REMOVEgmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4c347774(a)news.x-privat.org...
>
>> Do you know these 2.0l Mitsubishi motors?
>
> Reasonably.
>
>> How hard/expensive could it really be to replace the timing belt
>> cover??
>
> It depends on the vehicle.
>
> Mitsubishi spread their engines across a host of different vehicles,
> and the same base engine can be found in anything from an Express van
> to an Evo. How hard it is to do anything on them depends largely on
> what it is your trying to do and what vehicle the engine is in. With
> the timing cover, it's fairly easy to change one in a van as they run
> a north-south engine configuration with nothing in front to worry
> about other than the fan, but in some other vehicles with an
> east-west arrangement there's usually an engine support in the way
> that makes the job a lot more difficult.
> If the RVR is fwd, and I suspect it is, then changing the timing belt
> cover wouldn't be a five minute job. I'd also suspect that the rattle
> in the top of then engine *isn't* a timing cover problem as I've
> never seen one yet that has caused such an issue. I have, on the
> other hand, seen plenty of snapped balance shaft belts that cause
> similar problems.
> If you're concerned, I'd be pulling the front off the engine to take
> a look.

It does run East/West. And the bottom half of the cover does look tough to
access.

There is a sticker on the firewall from a mechanic shop that replaced the
timing belts for the last owner recently. Maybe I should run it in there and
see if they are willing to look at it. I don't have the space or tools to
pull it apart myself at the moment.

--
Brad


From: Brad on
Noddy wrote:
> " Scotty" <scoter1(a)warmmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4c357b72$0$17174$afc38c87(a)news.optusnet.com.au...
>
>> Or the noise is a well worn belt with some fabrib smacking the
>> plastic covers.
>
> That's pretty unlikely.
>
> There'd need to be some pretty substantial separation going on for the
> timing belt to be making a noise, and even then you'd only hear it
> for a very short time before the belt broke. If the noise is indeed
> due to a belt rubbing, then it's more likely to be the timing case
> rubbing on the belt (or a pulley) because it's lost a retaining bolt
> or two.

The mechanic that looked at it pretty much agrees with that diagnosis.

And although it is supposed to have new belts, the snapped balance shaft
belt theory you put forward in another post sounds like it may have some
potential as the issue too.

--
Brad


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