From: hls on
Just a general note about the Toyota recall:
We took our Avalon into the dealership to have the recommended
updates performed. Note that we had never had the slightest problem
with this car.

Nontheless, they performed the work quickly and at no cost to us.

A short time later, we noticed that the transmission was acting up on
this car.

We took it back today, fearing the worst, but it turns out the programming
was altered during the work, and the tranny had to be reprogrammed
to get back to the original drive characteristics.

For us, Toyota treated us well. The car never had a problem, but the
somewhat enigmatic recall problems were addressed, as were the
reprogramming issues that surfaced after the recall work.

I am still a strong Toyota supporter. After having been passed over
and peed on by GM for several decades, this is still much better than
what we had before.

C'mon, GM. Shape up.
From: sctvguy1 on
Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

> On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 10:07:29 -0400, sctvguy1 wrote:
>
>> Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:
>>
>>
>>>> According to the recall notice: "The pivot bushings in v ehicles with
>>>> oversized accelerator pedal bearing pockets may become dislodged and
>>>> potentially cause the accelerator pedal to bind or stick.
>>>
>>> I posted that in Toyota a few days ago. Same pedals. Stuck Accelerator:
>>> it's not just for Toyota any more! ;)
>> At least Chrysler gave the real reason for the pedal problem and didn't
>> bullshit the public for months like Toyota did.
>
>
> Perhaps it took that long for Toyota to find the real problem?
> Chrysler already had the leg work done for them.
So Toyota didn't want all their memos from over a year ago printed that
showed they KNEW what the problem was. Did they think that their stupid
owners would actually believe it was a "floor mat" problem?
From: dsi1 on
On 6/10/2010 4:07 AM, sctvguy1 wrote:
> At least Chrysler gave the real reason for the pedal problem and didn't
> bullshit the public for months like Toyota did.

A problem with a stuck pedal is easy to find and replicate. Therefore,
it's an easy fix and a recall makes sense. How do you fix a problem that
happens rarely and cannot be duplicated? I'm glad you believe that
Toyota knows what the problem is - I don't.