From: Dave Plowman (News) on
In article <f8ii3s$muu$1$8300dec7(a)news.demon.co.uk>,
moray <mtb_hyphen_rules(a)hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> > Where have you seen a maker recommending those RB&Y crimps for loom
> > repairs?

> Most common ones I deal with are the ones that come with replacement
> advance solenoids for Bosch VP pumps, plus I've seen them mentioned in
> official loom repair guides. Manufacturers spec a watertight and
> mechanically sound repair, which heatshrink butts meet. Plus they offer
> the advantages of being quicker to fit, and being able to fit them in
> more inaccesible places than you can solder. Manufacturer's certainly
> don't advise adding in extra connectors.

Heatshrink butts? I'm talking about the standard RB&Y pre-insulated
terminals being discussed here.

--
*Lottery: A tax on people who are bad at math.

Dave Plowman dave(a)davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
From: Doki on

"Dave Plowman (News)" <dave(a)davenoise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4f09665bd0dave(a)davenoise.co.uk...
> In article <ainqi.5298$By5.2754(a)text.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, Mr Cellophane
> <mrcellophane(a)hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>> Hello all after some guidance.
>
>> My son had his car an x reg Ford Focus Vtech broken into and despite the
>> car not being stolen the wiring was interfered with as if it was trying
>> to be hotwired.
>
>> he has been told that the entire wiring in the front end of the car
>> needs to be replaced due to the damage caused.
>
>> he has been quoted �2500 for this and told it can only be carried out by
>> a ford garage.
>
>> NE1 with experience of this type of thing ne1 got any advice on it in
>> general.
>
>> I realise its scant information to go on I am just really contesting the
>> fact he has been told (by more than one "garage" in quotes as both are
>> suspect in my view. One is the local authority garage the other was
>> quick fit!) it has to be done only by a ford garage.
>
>> If it does cost �2500 then it is likely to be written off as its only
>> worth �2500 at top end (actually I think its worth a bit less maybe
>> �1800 he bought it for �2150 after a bit of negotiation on the price)
>
> It depends on what part of the loom(s) are damaged. Most cars have several
> which plug together. If it is the main one which runs throughout most of
> the car it could be a deal of work to replace. If a sub assembly which,
> say, only does the engine it could be relatively simple. You need to
> identify which it is by the wire colours and then look at a parts
> catalogue for the car. A loom from a breaker's yard shouldn't be that
> expensive, although make sure it is for an identical model.
> However, any loom can be repaired. It would however require a skilled
> person to do the job correctly. Most mechanics and so called auto
> electricians bodge such things. The standard red blue and yellow
> electrical crimp terminals most use are really not up to the job and
> proper car connectors should be used instead. This is a source of such
> connectors and the correct wire if needed.
>
> http://www.vehicle-wiring-products.eu/VWP-onlinestore/home/homepage.php

Any chance of giving a bit of an idiots guide on crimps and crimp tools for
general auto electric use (ie, relatively low power stuff like radios and
alarms, and higher power stuff like headlamps)? Is it possible to produce
decent crimps with something like the PR4 that VWP sell? I'd like to produce
tidy wiring and be able to shove new connectors on things, but it's very
difficult to know what the right tool is without practical experience of the
job...

From: Malc on
On Jul 29, 10:39 pm, PC Paul <u...(a)bitrot.co.uk> wrote:

>
> Eww.. I guess that potting compound must have had redeeming features -
> I've only ever used ones that didn't expand at all.
>
> Got bloody hot, though...
>
> Were you making the hybrids, or buying them in? It all gets very strange
> working at that sort of scale - things melt and stick just from
> pressure, and you can barely see what you're working on, even with a
> microscope. And even then, ICs (hybrids just use the bare chips) don't
> look like they could possibly do anything, they're just covered in grey
> 1970's curtain patterns...

Bought in but designed to our spec. When one got dented one of our
engineers actually repaired/bridged the crack in the substrate as it
was our only working example. I could never hope to do such fine
soldering.

--
Malc

From: moray on

"Dave Plowman (News)" <dave(a)davenoise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4f0a33a831dave(a)davenoise.co.uk...
> In article <f8ii3s$muu$1$8300dec7(a)news.demon.co.uk>,
> moray <mtb_hyphen_rules(a)hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>> > Where have you seen a maker recommending those RB&Y crimps for loom
>> > repairs?
>
>> Most common ones I deal with are the ones that come with replacement
>> advance solenoids for Bosch VP pumps, plus I've seen them mentioned in
>> official loom repair guides. Manufacturers spec a watertight and
>> mechanically sound repair, which heatshrink butts meet. Plus they offer
>> the advantages of being quicker to fit, and being able to fit them in
>> more inaccesible places than you can solder. Manufacturer's certainly
>> don't advise adding in extra connectors.
>
> Heatshrink butts? I'm talking about the standard RB&Y pre-insulated
> terminals being discussed here.

I did wonder why you were getting so upset!
I avoid the standard preinsulated crimps at all costs, unless it's the only
option left or just a temp repair.

It just so happens heatshrink butts come in the same colours, as the cheap
and nasty preinsulated connectors. Although the heatshirnk butts are
semi-transparent so you can see if you've enough heat to get them to shrink
and the glue to melt and fully seal them.
Maybe not the most perfect crimp, but they do the job well, and avoid the
hassle of soldering (usually in some corner where you can just about get a
hand in, but not a hope of getting a soldering iron and solder in at the
same time) and using seperate heatshrink (which you normally forget to put
on, then have to start again).

On a side note, most repair kits for multiplugs in vehicles come with the
terminals precrimped onto a short section of wire. It saves the additional
expense of having to have numerous crimping tools.


From: Dave Plowman (News) on
In article <46ad17f6$0$24760$da0feed9(a)news.zen.co.uk>,
Doki <mrdoki(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > http://www.vehicle-wiring-products.eu/VWP-onlinestore/home/homepage.php

> Any chance of giving a bit of an idiots guide on crimps and crimp tools
> for general auto electric use (ie, relatively low power stuff like
> radios and alarms, and higher power stuff like headlamps)? Is it
> possible to produce decent crimps with something like the PR4 that VWP
> sell? I'd like to produce tidy wiring and be able to shove new
> connectors on things, but it's very difficult to know what the right
> tool is without practical experience of the job...

The Repaults (PR3) is quite simply the dog's bollocks for most UK
terminals. As well it should be at over 70 quid.

--
*Someday, we'll look back on this, laugh nervously and change the subject

Dave Plowman dave(a)davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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