From: boltar2003 on
On Tue, 25 May 2010 15:58:35 +0100
Albert T Cone <a.k.kirby(a)durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>On 23/05/2010 13:23, Silk wrote:
>> On 23/05/2010 09:56, GT wrote:
>>
>>> The hose length is controlled by law - it cannot touch the ground when
>>> the
>>> nozzel is 'parked'.
>>
>> I think you may have made that up. I've seen plenty that drag on the
>> ground. That's why they have rubber rings around the hose that settle at
>> the point where the hose scrapes on the floor, to stop it chaffing.
>
>Those aren't rubber rings - they are ferrous rings and are there to
>prevent arcing when you touch the filler nozzle to the car body.

Huh? Surely the pump is earthed internally?

B2003

From: bod on
boltar2003(a)boltar.world wrote:
> On Tue, 25 May 2010 15:58:35 +0100
> Albert T Cone <a.k.kirby(a)durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>> On 23/05/2010 13:23, Silk wrote:
>>> On 23/05/2010 09:56, GT wrote:
>>>
>>>> The hose length is controlled by law - it cannot touch the ground when
>>>> the
>>>> nozzel is 'parked'.
>>> I think you may have made that up. I've seen plenty that drag on the
>>> ground. That's why they have rubber rings around the hose that settle at
>>> the point where the hose scrapes on the floor, to stop it chaffing.
>> Those aren't rubber rings - they are ferrous rings and are there to
>> prevent arcing when you touch the filler nozzle to the car body.
>
> Huh? Surely the pump is earthed internally?
>
> B2003
>
>
Anyway, as far as I understand it, the pumps are protected with a shut
off device if a pump catches alight.

Bod
From: Ian Jackson on
In message <86299kFuarU2(a)mid.individual.net>, bod
<bodron57(a)tiscali.co.uk> writes
>boltar2003(a)boltar.world wrote:
>> On Tue, 25 May 2010 15:58:35 +0100
>> Albert T Cone <a.k.kirby(a)durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>>> On 23/05/2010 13:23, Silk wrote:
>>>> On 23/05/2010 09:56, GT wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The hose length is controlled by law - it cannot touch the ground when
>>>>> the
>>>>> nozzel is 'parked'.
>>>> I think you may have made that up. I've seen plenty that drag on the
>>>> ground. That's why they have rubber rings around the hose that settle at
>>>> the point where the hose scrapes on the floor, to stop it chaffing.
>>> Those aren't rubber rings - they are ferrous rings and are there to
>>>prevent arcing when you touch the filler nozzle to the car body.
>> Huh? Surely the pump is earthed internally? B2003
>>
>>
>Anyway, as far as I understand it, the pumps are protected with a shut
>off device if a pump catches alight.
>
If that American video it to be believed, the most important thing is
not to get back in your car when the filler nozzle is still in the car.
If you charge yourself up as you slide out of the seat, and then touch
the handle of filler nozzle (which will be 'earthed' to the car), any
spark will be in very close proximity to any vapour issuing from the car
filler and tank.
--
Ian
From: Albert T Cone on
boltar2003(a)boltar.world wrote:
> On Tue, 25 May 2010 15:58:35 +0100
> Albert T Cone <a.k.kirby(a)durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>> On 23/05/2010 13:23, Silk wrote:
>>> On 23/05/2010 09:56, GT wrote:
>>>
>>>> The hose length is controlled by law - it cannot touch the ground when
>>>> the
>>>> nozzel is 'parked'.
>>> I think you may have made that up. I've seen plenty that drag on the
>>> ground. That's why they have rubber rings around the hose that settle at
>>> the point where the hose scrapes on the floor, to stop it chaffing.
>> Those aren't rubber rings - they are ferrous rings and are there to
>> prevent arcing when you touch the filler nozzle to the car body.
>
> Huh? Surely the pump is earthed internally?

Indeed, so when a car body which has been nicely charged up by hurtling
through dry air is connected to it, it will act as a nice current sink.
The ferrite rings just limit the rate at which the current can build
up, so they reduce the chance of there being a spark.
From: Albert T Cone on
bod wrote:
> boltar2003(a)boltar.world wrote:
>> On Tue, 25 May 2010 15:58:35 +0100
>> Albert T Cone <a.k.kirby(a)durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>>> On 23/05/2010 13:23, Silk wrote:
>>>> On 23/05/2010 09:56, GT wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The hose length is controlled by law - it cannot touch the ground when
>>>>> the
>>>>> nozzel is 'parked'.
>>>> I think you may have made that up. I've seen plenty that drag on the
>>>> ground. That's why they have rubber rings around the hose that
>>>> settle at
>>>> the point where the hose scrapes on the floor, to stop it chaffing.
>>> Those aren't rubber rings - they are ferrous rings and are there to
>>> prevent arcing when you touch the filler nozzle to the car body.
>>
>> Huh? Surely the pump is earthed internally?
>> B2003
>>
> >
> Anyway, as far as I understand it, the pumps are protected with a shut
> off device if a pump catches alight.

Quite probably, although I think they would generally prefer it if that
didn't happen in the first place.